KJ Imagery Comics

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KJones
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KJ Imagery Comics

Post by KJones » Tue Jun 23, 2009 9:34 pm

I was planing on puting it in print on lulu.com but I may end up doing a web comic them have it up for prints, just as soon as I can find the right comic host. untile then I'm just working on the pages. This comic is about my latest creation called "Zoogville".

Sorry about the links, I'm still tring to figure out the image posting thing here.

http://slasher12.deviantart.com/art/ZC- ... -116603370
http://slasher12.deviantart.com/art/ZC- ... -121036765
http://slasher12.deviantart.com/art/ZC- ... -121037909

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Hyperion
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Post by Hyperion » Wed Jun 24, 2009 12:08 am

Looks a lot like the old Talespin cartoon...which happens to be one of my all time favorite cartoons, so great job.
really really witty quote

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KJones
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Post by KJones » Sat Jun 27, 2009 10:26 am

Thanks :D

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KJones
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Post by KJones » Tue Jun 30, 2009 12:06 am

Here's another page this one's a short comic.
Edited
Image
Last edited by KJones on Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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squirpy
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Post by squirpy » Tue Jun 30, 2009 8:45 am

go to photobucket.com, get an account, upload there, then copy over the link - under the image it will even have a section for forum postings with the [ IMG] code already attached to it.
I keep a sketchblog here

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KJones
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Post by KJones » Tue Jun 30, 2009 12:06 pm

Thanks.
I'm not much of a photobucket person But I'll give it a try.
Dosen't the blog and Deviantart can do this?

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KJones
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by KJones » Wed Jul 29, 2009 10:36 pm

Thank for your segustion on opening an account with photobucket.com Squirpy it helps alot:D
So now i'm reposting the images. Here's the comic I have so far I manage to get five pages so far and on starting on page six.
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

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KJones
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by KJones » Thu Aug 27, 2009 4:54 pm

I haven't been updating here lately, I've been real busy.

This was originally a short exserise thumbnail I did while I was doing the Zoogville comic, but the more I worked on the thumbnails the more I got into thinking of making it into a full comic as well, And so I developed it into three pages.

These characters are new in my family of characters the title for this project is as it say on the pages " Nestor & Truffy".
The story of this is the elephant name Truffy, she's looking for Nestor the leopard so she can spend time with him, but Nestor doesn’t want to so he hides and sneaks away knowing how obsess she is with him.

Image

Image

Image

This is a work in progress comic I’ll come back and add color and text, and I got to design a logo for this.

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Joost
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by Joost » Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:57 am

This looks so cool! Can't wait to you colour this! Priceless expression on Nestor’s face in the last panel! :D

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Mr. Average
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by Mr. Average » Fri Aug 28, 2009 9:41 am

Actually, I think the pages in black and white stand alone fairly well without color. A few choice brush strikes to thicken up some lines, just a little more delineation between foreground and background, and I think it'd be pretty solid on its own.

--M
Image Image

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thirdeyeh
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by thirdeyeh » Sat Aug 29, 2009 8:08 am

Great linework and expression kjones (Orlando, Florida is like my second hometown. I love that city). I have to say that the thing I think is really holding back your pages is the coloring. I say that for this reason. Everything is too bright. All of the colors are fighting each other for our attention. Try using some tools in Photoshop (or whatever software you use) to blend things out. Like for instance, in photoshop you can throw a layer on top of everything, set it to a certain color and then adjust the layer setting to multiply or color. For there you just adjust the layer's opacity. What that does is add that color tint to whole image. From there you can go in and erase certain spots on the color layer to make your characters stand out or whatever. I don't know if that makes sense.
Image

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Wei2k
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by Wei2k » Sat Aug 29, 2009 12:28 pm

nice work kj! i'd agree with 3rd eye in that your designs and linework are strong but the colors are all a bit too saturated and loud. if you tone down your colors and up the contrast on only the spots where you want the viewer's attention to focus, that'd help. anyhow neat story and can't wait to see more.

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KJones
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by KJones » Sat Aug 29, 2009 1:52 pm

thirdeyeh wrote:Great linework and expression kjones (Orlando, Florida is like my second hometown. I love that city). I have to say that the thing I think is really holding back your pages is the coloring. I say that for this reason. Everything is too bright. All of the colors are fighting each other for our attention. Try using some tools in Photoshop (or whatever software you use) to blend things out. Like for instance, in photoshop you can throw a layer on top of everything, set it to a certain color and then adjust the layer setting to multiply or color. For there you just adjust the layer's opacity. What that does is add that color tint to whole image. From there you can go in and erase certain spots on the color layer to make your characters stand out or whatever. I don't know if that makes sense.
Thanks, I use Artrage.
I don't have a photoshop to do anything like you said, I can't aford it.
Butt I can try what you said for the artrage and see if it will work.

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KJones
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by KJones » Sat Aug 29, 2009 2:04 pm

Mr. Average wrote:Actually, I think the pages in black and white stand alone fairly well without color. A few choice brush strikes to thicken up some lines, just a little more delineation between foreground and background, and I think it'd be pretty solid on its own.

--M
Thanks for the advice

I have been doing black and white comics, those were fan comics me and my friend did a collab on. I use that for practice for makeing comics but I do need more work with brush strokes, Is the a book that show you how to do it?

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Mr. Average
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Re: KJ Imagery Comics

Post by Mr. Average » Sat Aug 29, 2009 7:42 pm

There are a lot of books on brushwork available but I have never found one that really boils down to much more than "practice it until it does what you want it to do." So that's my best advice. Some more specific ideas are to get a brush-pen, such as those in the Copic series made by Too-Japan. They're less expensive and give you a pretty good fell of what a brush can do. But if you want to go all the way, what I use is a daVinci Mestro Kolinksy Sable #4 Round watercolor brush with Higgins Black Magic india ink.

I used to teach mechanical drawing long ago but I'm by no means an expert on brush work. Forgive me then if this seems long-winded, but it's what I wish someone had told ME straight out a long time ago:

1) Select your brush based on the maximum size you want your lines to be. A good brush will be fine enough to make very thin lines no matter its size, but it can never make lines thicker than the spread of its bristles. For comics and inkwork generally you'd likely want a round watercolor brush. For practice, nylon is a cheap alternative but you will never get as clean a line out of it as with Russian Kolinsky Sable, which is be-all and end-all of brush materials, but can be quite expensive. I have three that I use, but only one that I use really frequently, and I'd bet that once you find the brush you're comfortable with you'll only use that one and no others. The right tool for the right job. Select it based on the size of the bell (the wide part at the middle where most of the liquid stays when you dip it in ink or water) and the sharpness of the point. You can test this in the storue, usually, if you ask the people there, with a little water. Soften the bristles up by bending them in your thumb and forefinger, very gently(they're usually packed in gum arabic which is soluble, to keep the brisles from getting damaged), then dip it in water. The brush should hold a decent amount of water while still keeping a sharp tip. It should not drip or separate. Then shake it clean with a single sharp flick of your wrist. This is called "snapping" the brush. The bristles should come to a nice sharp point and the water should fall cleanly out of the brush tip. If those parameters are met, buy the brush.

2) Keep your wrist locked and brush with your whole forarm. This takes a TON of practice and I haven't mastered it yet, but I find that this is how I get the most satisfying lines. Buy ink paper and practice strokes. Also practice sketching just with the brush, straight ink-to-paper. The scratch pad I use for ink testing is Seth Cole "Paper for Pens" which has a nice tight bond and will not bleed or smear, and is also semi-translucent so I can lay it over other sheets on my lightbox (a recent addition to my studio) and practice over-inking lines without committing to them. An advantage to the brush is the level of control it can give you - actually far more control than is true with pens, and this means that only very little differences in pressure and angle can drastically change the look of the lines a brush produces. That means that good technique is essential to making it work right - and this is something I am still trying to learn fully myself. Really the only way to learn this is to test it out a LOT and just keep working with it until you find the combination of strokes that pleases you. It's intimidating, but the times I've gotten it right have been really much better looking than the times I've tried to simulate the same effect with another tool. In the end there's no substitute for the "real thing."

3) Learn to grip the brush properly, i.e., with the thumb and forefinger, lightly, braced against the first joint of the middle finger, and held with the barrel of the brush as nearly perpendicular to the page as possible. Part of this is in the fact that the thickness of the line varies with the angle of the brush to the page, and so holding it as you would hold a pen is going to give an unsatisfactory result. It will also make curves considerably thicker at the apex of the arc than at the ends, which is not a very controlled stroke, and can leave a lot of ink on the page that will be prone to smearing.

4) Accept that mistakes with ink will happen and can be corrected. Buy a tube of "zinc white" gouache and use it pure from the tube to cover mistakes. Keep a separate brush for using gouache.

5) Keep your inking brush immaculate. Never dip it into the ink so deeply that the bristles are totally covered, and certainly never up to the ferrule (the little metal part that holds the bristles in place). About 2/3 of the way up the head of the brush is about right. AND, I cannot stress this enough, CLEAN it properly. It's a product made of hair so it needs to be treated as such. There are brush soaps available, but I have had considerable success with dandruff shampoo, which has restored my brush many times after careless mistakes with ink and wash. When you clean it, do so gently. Never ram the brisles down vertically. Use warm, but not hot, water in a gentle flow under the tap. Put a little shampoo in the line of the palm of your hand, and draw the brush through it, swirling it back and forth to wash it in the soap thoroughly, then rinse it out completely under the water, in the same way. Then snap it to a point and let it dry out on its own - never dry it against a cloth or anything else as this will introduce fibers of whatever material, (paper, tissue, cloth) into the tip of the brush and will cause it to dry differentially - it will develop "split ends." Store it upright and never put pressure on the tip or do anything that will bend or de-shape the bristles. If you keep it in a box, make sure there is no pressure at ALL on the bristles - a little rolled tube of paper taped around the tip will accomplish this.

That's my best advice there. Hope you find it helpful. I know it probably sounds very didactic, but hey.

--M
Image Image

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