The Barn Owl Comic--NOW IN COLOR!

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RobPeters
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The Barn Owl Comic--NOW IN COLOR!

Post by RobPeters » Tue Jan 20, 2009 10:07 am

Here's a little comic I just finished. It's just Black and White for now, but I might color it if I have time later on. It's loosely based on an old Grimm's Fairy Tale.
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What do you think?
Rob
Last edited by RobPeters on Sat Feb 21, 2009 10:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

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RobPeters
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Post by RobPeters » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:30 am

I colored the first page. Hopefully I will get the rest colored in the next few days. What do you guys think?

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Post by RobPeters » Mon Feb 16, 2009 12:24 pm

Pages 2 and 3 are now in color as well. What do you think? Does anyone like it?

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nateomedia
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Post by nateomedia » Mon Feb 16, 2009 3:02 pm

You have a nice drawing style and your storytelling abilities are pretty strong -- it's really easy to follow the flow of the comic. However, I just can't get past the premise. The owl is just not sinister in any way and I can't make myself believe that all these people are frightened by it. I also am not understanding why they are not identifying the owl's hoot for what it is.

The rest of your story uses a lot of cartoonish exaggeration -- why did you choose not to do the same with the owl? Perhaps its voice is amplified by a milk jug or it gets caught up in a tarp that makes it seem unnaturally large. If a man can run all the way into town, why can't the owl be turned into something that the reader can believe is frightening and monster-ish?

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RobPeters
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Post by RobPeters » Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:37 am

Nateomedia,
Thanks for the compliments on the drawing and storytelling. I approached this primarily as an excercise in strengthening my storytelling skills, so I'm thrilled that the story works on that level.
I'm sorry the premise didn't work for you, I was afraid of that. The story isn't original to me, it's based on an old Fairy Tale by the Brothers Grimm. I considered exaggerating the owl in some way but decided to keep the premise the same as in the original tale. Even in the original, it was never quite believable that everyone was afraid of an owl. Oh well.
I think my next comic will have an original plot, so hopefully that'll work better.

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nateomedia
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Post by nateomedia » Wed Feb 18, 2009 2:15 pm

I read a blog this week that threw out a quote from a book called Art & Fear. I got a lot out of it and I think you might too:
The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: fifty pound of pots rated an "A", forty pounds a "B", and so on. Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one pot -- albeit a perfect one -- to get an "A". Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity. It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work - and learning from their mistakes -- the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.
Like you said, just keep making comics. You're clearly a talented draftsman.

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RobPeters
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Post by RobPeters » Sat Feb 21, 2009 10:53 am

Nateomedia, thanks for the encouragement. I will definately keep working.
I just finished coloring the comic. What does everyone think?

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neil
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Post by neil » Sun Feb 22, 2009 12:09 am

You lost me at "...when people aren't as smart as they are now"--that's like reading, you won't relate to this at all. I think it's a pretty fatal premise for any story.

But I agree with nateomedia; keep practicing!

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RobPeters
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Post by RobPeters » Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:05 am

Neil, I'm sorry the opening line doesn't work for you. It's a paraphrase of the opening line to the original fairy tale (and the only line I took from the Brothers Grimm). I thought it was an easy way to explain the character's behavior, but maybe not.
I guess there's a reason this was such an obscure fairy tale. The premise is unbelievable and the opening line is bad.
But what about the rest of the comic? Is the dialogue amusing? How's the art? Does the rough, slightly painterly coloring work? Is it a fun read, even if it's unbelievable?

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