Advice?

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Rowan
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Advice?

Post by Rowan » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:06 am

Howdy!

I've been writing a story for a graphic novel for sometime now, and i'm looking as to how to go about presenting it.

I'd like to put it up as a webcomic, but i hope to get it published later.

Does already having it seen by the world reduce the likehood of a publisher accepting it?

I was hoping by putting it online i could drum up interest before hand so that more people will have heard about it.
Thanks a lot! :)

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Kazu
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Post by Kazu » Tue Aug 12, 2008 11:26 am

Quite a few artists get their books published after they have it posted online. Kean Soo's Jellaby was a webcomic for 60 pages before Hyperion picked it up, and Hope Larson posted a few pages of Salamander Dream before AdHouse offered to publish it. I've been drawing webcomics for a while, and if it weren't for my webcomic Copper, then I would never have been able to put together Flight, and now the Copper strips will be collected in a printed volume from Scholastic. Put your comics anywhere and everywhere, and draw a ton of them. It can only help.
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:05 pm

This made my day :D
Thank you Kazu. i'll keep the forum posted on the progress ;)

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Joey
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Post by Joey » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:24 pm

It was actually thanks to Kazu's advice that I decided to serialize my first graphic novel, The Ride Home, online (here). I know the fear -- that if people can read it for free, will they buy it in book form? Believe me, TRH being online has helped me gain more fans than book solicitations alone would have. And I think that most of them did buy the book (also published by publisher extraordinaire AdHouse Books 8) )
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Kean
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Post by Kean » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:33 pm

As Kazu and Joey have mentioned, there is quite a good case for posting your stuff to the web first. These days, you can point to the success of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and know it can be done -- Wimpy Kid started life as a webcomic with a very modest audience, and since seeing publication, it's now sold over a million copies, and 80% of the material from the books are still available to read on the web for free.

And even if you don't get that immediate offer from a publisher (if no one is willing to take a chance on your work because it is too "out there" crazy or whatever), there are also cases of webcomics that have built their audience and become successful soley on the web, and the print collections are basically a secondary market (Perry Bible Fellowship, Goats).

So yes! Go for it. You have absolutely nothing to lose, after all.

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jdalton
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Post by jdalton » Thu Aug 14, 2008 3:28 pm

I agree with the others- and I think it's great that the internet can be used in this way! Comics is such an isolating business without that online connection. I have a book that is currently being looked at by some publishers. I have no idea if it will actually get picked up by anyone, but so far the indication is that the people who don't want it aren't making their decision based on the fact that it's posted online.
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu Aug 14, 2008 3:29 pm

thanks guys, ive started building the website!
i'll keep you posted :)

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